2018 Beekeeping Mentoring Program

6 posts

June 2018 Beekeeping Mentoring Session

Hardin County Kentucky Beekeepers Association logo

In the June Beekeeping Mentoring Session, mentees gained knowledge for managing honey supers.

Mentor David Shockey discusses how much a single frame of capped honey can weigh and how that is multiplied when working with a super full of frames.
Mentor David Shockey discusses how much a single frame of capped honey can weigh and how that is multiplied when working with a super full of frames.
While listening to Mentor David Shockey, mentee Gary Yochim inspects a frame of capped honey that is definitely heavier than it looks before passing it along to other mentees to examine.
While listening to Mentor David Shockey, mentee Gary Yochim inspects a frame of capped honey that is definitely heavier than it looks before passing it along to other mentees to examine.

 

Be sure to have something available for the bottom as well as on the top of a honey super once it’s removed from the hive. Otherwise, the bees will follow the frames of honey inside the super to the new location. This also helps prevent robbing while working the hives.
Be sure to have something available for the bottom as well as on the top of a honey super once it’s removed from the hive. Otherwise, the bees will follow the frames of honey inside the super to the new location. This also helps prevent robbing while working the hives.
When accessing a honey super, lightly spray the inside of a fume board with an all-natural product such as HoneyBGone to encourage the honey bees to quickly move down in the hive and away from the top frames of honey.
When accessing a honey super, lightly spray the inside of a fume board with an all-natural product such as HoneyBGone to encourage the honey bees to quickly move down in the hive and away from the top frames of honey.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey lightly sprays HoneyBGone on the inside of a fume board before placing it on top of the honey super to encourage the bees to quickly move down in the hive.
Mentor David Shockey lightly sprays HoneyBGone on the inside of a fume board before placing it on top of the honey super to encourage the bees to quickly move down in the hive.
Mentee Rick Burch lifts the fume board to see if the bees have cleared the super to start checking honey frames while mentor David Shockey watches.
Mentee Rick Burch lifts the fume board to see if the bees have cleared the super to start checking honey frames while mentor David Shockey watches.
Mentee Rick Burch holds a frame of partially capped honey while mentees John Dikes and Ray Yates observe and Mentor David Shockey pulls another frame.
Mentee Rick Burch holds a frame of partially capped honey while mentees John Dikes and Ray Yates observe and Mentor David Shockey pulls another frame.
Okay, ladies and gents…we’re going to need a ladder to reach the top super. Mentees took turns serving as a “spotter” any time someone needed to use the ladder to keep safety a priority.
Okay, ladies and gents…we’re going to need a ladder to reach the top super. Mentees took turns serving as a “spotter” any time someone needed to use the ladder to keep safety a priority.
Mentee Sharon Woodring secures the honey super with a “lid” to deter bees from entering it while others check to see if any more frames of honey can be pulled from the hives. The same type of temporary “lid” is placed on the ground underneath the super first before setting the super down.
Mentee Sharon Woodring secures the honey super with a “lid” to deter bees from entering it while others check to see if any more frames of honey can be pulled from the hives. The same type of temporary “lid” is placed on the ground underneath the super first before setting the super down.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees Rick Burch, John Dikes, and Ray Yates take time to cool off in a little air conditioning and rehydrate with water after working in the apiary with temps around 90 degrees. Whew!
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees Rick Burch, John Dikes, and Ray Yates take time to cool off in a little air conditioning and rehydrate with water after working in the apiary with temps around 90 degrees. Whew!

May 2018 Beekeeping Mentoring Session

Hardin County Kentucky Beekeepers Association logoSwarming, requeening options, hive inspections, adding honey supers, dealing with hive beetles, varroa mite treatments, feeding bees, and starting new hives using packaged bees or nucs were discussed during the May Beekeeping Mentoring Session.

Mentor David Shockey illustrates requeening a hive with a purchased queen received in a cage as mentee Gil Shatto observes.
Mentor David Shockey illustrates requeening a hive with a purchased queen received in a cage as mentee Gil Shatto observes.

Another option is requeening a hive using frames from a nuc and a deep brood box.

Mentor David Shockey looks to answer a question as mentee Wayne Noe holds a deep brood box with four new frames containing beeswax foundation sheets.
Mentor David Shockey looks to answer a question as mentee Wayne Noe holds a deep brood box with four new frames containing beeswax foundation sheets.
Mentor David Shockey reviews timing to perform inspections on newly established hives, fully established hives, and during the nectar flow.
Mentor David Shockey reviews timing to perform inspections on newly established hives, fully established hives, and during the nectar flow.

The first team was assigned to set up a new hive by installing a package of bees.

Mentees Steve Green and Bob Elliott prepare the hive box as David Shockey guides them and the other mentees watch.
Mentees Steve Green and Bob Elliott prepare the hive box as David Shockey guides them and the other mentees watch.
Beautiful day with ideal weather to work in the apiary.
Beautiful day with ideal weather to work in the apiary.
Mentees Gary Thomas and Steve Green open the package of honey bees.
Mentees Gary Thomas and Steve Green open the package of honey bees.
Mentee Steve Green lightly sprays the new package of honey bees with sugar water before removing the feeder can of syrup from the top.
Mentee Steve Green lightly sprays the new package of honey bees with sugar water before removing the feeder can of syrup from the top.
Mentee Terry Henry begins a hive inspection for his team.
Mentee Terry Henry begins a hive inspection for his team.
A J-hook hive tool is used to help lift the first frame up.
A J-hook hive tool is used to help lift the first frame up.
The first frame is gingerly removed from the hive to inspect. Remember to look for the queen!
The first frame is gingerly removed from the hive to inspect. Remember to look for the queen!
David Shockey demonstrates how to place the removed frame on the frame holder that has been temporarily placed on the side of the hive.
David Shockey demonstrates how to place the removed frame on the frame holder that has been temporarily placed on the side of the hive.
Mentee Terry Henry examines the second frame removed from the hive while other mentees observe.
Mentee Terry Henry examines the second frame removed from the hive while other mentees observe.
David Shockey points out different things to look for during a hive inspection while holding the third removed frame.
David Shockey points out different things to look for during a hive inspection while holding the third removed frame.
Mentees rehydrate following a warm morning in the apiary as David Shockey recaps the session.
Mentees rehydrate following a warm morning in the apiary as David Shockey recaps the session.

April 2018 Beekeeping Mentoring Session

Hardin County Kentucky Beekeepers Association logoTorrential rain visited the area during the April Beekeeping Mentoring Session, so mentees stayed dry inside the Bee Barn and gained knowledge about swarms, swarm catching, the national hive losses survey, varroa mite and hive beetle treatments, hive maintenance, installing honey supers and partial queen excluders, entrance reducers, package bees, and installing a nuc to start a new bee hive.

Mentor, David Shockey demonstrates how to place a nuc box in a tree line to capture a swarm.
Mentor, David Shockey demonstrates how to place a nuc box in a tree line to capture a swarm.
Mentees intently listen and ask questions.
Mentees intently listen and ask questions.
David Shockey illustrates how to install a nuc to start a new bee hive.
David Shockey illustrates how to install a nuc to start a new bee hive.
Following the mentoring session, a break in rain permitted a few remaining mentees to assist Mentor, David Shockey in starting new bee hives by installing nucs.
Following the mentoring session, a break in rain permitted a few remaining mentees to assist Mentor, David Shockey in starting new bee hives by installing nucs.
The honey bees acclimate to their new hives while Mentor David Shockey and mentees are grateful to have finished before any more rain moved into the apiary.
The honey bees acclimate to their new hives while Mentor David Shockey and mentees are grateful to have finished before any more rain moved into the apiary.