June 2018 Beekeeping Mentoring Session

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In the June Beekeeping Mentoring Session, mentees gained knowledge for managing honey supers.

Mentor David Shockey discusses how much a single frame of capped honey can weigh and how that is multiplied when working with a super full of frames.
Mentor David Shockey discusses how much a single frame of capped honey can weigh and how that is multiplied when working with a super full of frames.
While listening to Mentor David Shockey, mentee Gary Yochim inspects a frame of capped honey that is definitely heavier than it looks before passing it along to other mentees to examine.
While listening to Mentor David Shockey, mentee Gary Yochim inspects a frame of capped honey that is definitely heavier than it looks before passing it along to other mentees to examine.

 

Be sure to have something available for the bottom as well as on the top of a honey super once it’s removed from the hive. Otherwise, the bees will follow the frames of honey inside the super to the new location. This also helps prevent robbing while working the hives.
Be sure to have something available for the bottom as well as on the top of a honey super once it’s removed from the hive. Otherwise, the bees will follow the frames of honey inside the super to the new location. This also helps prevent robbing while working the hives.
When accessing a honey super, lightly spray the inside of a fume board with an all-natural product such as HoneyBGone to encourage the honey bees to quickly move down in the hive and away from the top frames of honey.
When accessing a honey super, lightly spray the inside of a fume board with an all-natural product such as HoneyBGone to encourage the honey bees to quickly move down in the hive and away from the top frames of honey.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees look toward the hives in the apiary before suiting up to check for capped frames of honey in the supers.
Mentor David Shockey lightly sprays HoneyBGone on the inside of a fume board before placing it on top of the honey super to encourage the bees to quickly move down in the hive.
Mentor David Shockey lightly sprays HoneyBGone on the inside of a fume board before placing it on top of the honey super to encourage the bees to quickly move down in the hive.
Mentee Rick Burch lifts the fume board to see if the bees have cleared the super to start checking honey frames while mentor David Shockey watches.
Mentee Rick Burch lifts the fume board to see if the bees have cleared the super to start checking honey frames while mentor David Shockey watches.
Mentee Rick Burch holds a frame of partially capped honey while mentees John Dikes and Ray Yates observe and Mentor David Shockey pulls another frame.
Mentee Rick Burch holds a frame of partially capped honey while mentees John Dikes and Ray Yates observe and Mentor David Shockey pulls another frame.
Okay, ladies and gents…we’re going to need a ladder to reach the top super. Mentees took turns serving as a “spotter” any time someone needed to use the ladder to keep safety a priority.
Okay, ladies and gents…we’re going to need a ladder to reach the top super. Mentees took turns serving as a “spotter” any time someone needed to use the ladder to keep safety a priority.
Mentee Sharon Woodring secures the honey super with a “lid” to deter bees from entering it while others check to see if any more frames of honey can be pulled from the hives. The same type of temporary “lid” is placed on the ground underneath the super first before setting the super down.
Mentee Sharon Woodring secures the honey super with a “lid” to deter bees from entering it while others check to see if any more frames of honey can be pulled from the hives. The same type of temporary “lid” is placed on the ground underneath the super first before setting the super down.
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees Rick Burch, John Dikes, and Ray Yates take time to cool off in a little air conditioning and rehydrate with water after working in the apiary with temps around 90 degrees. Whew!
Mentor David Shockey along with mentees Rick Burch, John Dikes, and Ray Yates take time to cool off in a little air conditioning and rehydrate with water after working in the apiary with temps around 90 degrees. Whew!

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